The Phoenix Nest

Twin Falls / Jerome KOA, near Twin Falls, Idaho

Twin Falls / Jerome KOA, near Twin Falls, Idaho

A Stop on the Phoenix's Grand Fossil Tour

By Jim Fulton

I spent two relaxed, but mostly rainy, cool weeks at the Twin Falls / Jerome KOA, near Twin Falls, Idaho, the longer than previously normal stay emblematic of my intent to travel more slowly during this part of my Tour. I picked Twin Falls because it is on the main route from Seattle into the central Rocky Mountains, but I learned only after arriving that there are some sites worth seeing, which I report on below.

Arrival Day of Tour Nights Departure
GFT GFT 2
2019/5/7 504 7 14 2019/5/21
Mileage Elevation
Odometer Map Actual Local Accumulated   Feet Meters
52,200 340 359 263 GFT 33,683 Actual 3,745 1,141
GFT 2 673 Δ 2,545 776
Page Contents

Twin Falls, Idaho

Twin Falls lies on the primary route (I-84) between Seattle and Salt Lake City. A brief drive around the area reveals its primary industry: feed lots, farm implement companies, large, operating irrigation systems, and fields of hay being sown, cultivated, or harvested. Pretty much like my old Kansas home, with a greater emphasis on cattle.

The Journey to Twin Falls

The Journey to Twin Falls

I arrived at the KOA near Twin Falls, Idaho, just ahead of the thunderstorm that I’d been watching for the last hundred miles, sometimes ahead of me, sometimes to my left, but always threatening. As I pulled into my site, the advance wind was gusting, raising vortexes in surrounding air (more like dust devils than tornados), and banging the doors on my truck and trailer. I managed to get set up and inside before the rains hit, and as thunderstorms go, this one was not severe, but I was glad to settle down and relax.

It had been a pleasant day. I left Pendleton about 8 am (an efficient one hour after getting up, necessary because it was going to be a long drive), crossed the ridge to the east and found myself in the eastern foothills of the Cascades. For about a half an hour I drove through a stretch of hills (euphemized as the Blue Mountains) covered with firs, spruce, and pines. A ways to the west were some real mountains still covered in snow.

I passed without recognizing the spot where last year one of my trailer tires blew out. I did look for it, but none of the landmarks seemed to match my faded memory. The colors were definitely different. Last year the land was the golden brown of fall; yesterday they were bright green, with orange wildflowers scattered hither and thither.

From Baker City to Twin Fall, the landscape is pretty much the same, undulating, arid land made arable with irrigation, fields in various stages of spring planting, the interstate filled with trucks on the main corridor between Salt Lake City and Portland/Seattle.

The day was far too long (340 miles in 6½ hours). The hazy horizons and dreary landscape of the last couple hours reflected my mood. The thunderstorm that I was approaching provided a focus of interest that kept me from drifting into drowsiness, so I guess it was put there for a reason.

Maps of Journey

Maps of the Phoenix's journey to, around, and from Twin Falls.Phoenix Popup

Previous Location: Pendleton KOA, Pendleton, Oregon
Route of Journey to Twin Falls, Idaho, from Pendleton, Oregon
Route of Journey to Twin Falls, Idaho, from Pendleton, Oregon
Current Location: Twin Falls / Jerome KOA, Twin Falls, Idaho
Route of Journey from Twin Falls, Idaho, to Salt Lake City, Utah
Route of Journey from Twin Falls, Idaho, to Salt Lake City, Utah
Next Destination: Salt Lake City KOA, Salt Lake City, Utah

Twin Falls / Jerome KOA

This is one of the smaller KOAs I've been to, just a couple short loops of narrow sites. Fortunately, given the increasing warmth of the afternoon sun, my site was well-shaded. The wifi provided by my cellular hot-spot was adequate on my computer and poor on my phone and tablet. A pleasant surprise was the frequent, soft "coo-OOO-coo" of the mourning doves, a nostalgic echo of visits to my grandmother's oh-so-many years ago.

This park featured a site layout that I've only seen once or twice before: adjacent units enter from opposite directions. The benefit of the layout is that when you open your front door, you look out onto your neighbors' front door, not their utility hookups, and you have a greater chance of greeting them. If you're an introvert, that might not be a blessing, but I tend to prefer the layout. In this case, it didn't matter much: the facing site was not occupied for most of my stay.

For a location remote from popular tourist attractions, this KOA was expensive. Like many KOAs I've visited, this one is investing in cabins, so there was some construction noise during some days, but it wasn't intrusive. If I were a KOA stockholder, I would doubt the wisdom of this investment, like others that KOA is making to justify their rising resort level rates. There's an old saying about sow's ears and silk purses. In particular I doubt that this KOA can ever hope to be a vacation destination rather than a stop on the way. My rating of 6 of 10 reflects my assessment of the cost/value ratio.

Photo Gallery for Twin Falls / Jerome KOA

Twin Falls / Jerome KOA
Twin Falls / Jerome KOA
Twin Falls / Jerome KOA
Twin Falls / Jerome KOA
Twin Falls / Jerome KOA
Twin Falls / Jerome KOA
Twin Falls / Jerome KOA
Twin Falls / Jerome KOA
Twin Falls / Jerome KOA
Twin Falls / Jerome KOA
Twin Falls / Jerome KOA
Twin Falls / Jerome KOA
Twin Falls / Jerome KOA
Twin Falls / Jerome KOA
Address 441 S Liberty Lane
Jerome ID 83338
Home Page https://koa.com/campgrounds/twin-falls/
Phone ‭(208) 324-4169
Associations
Rate (net US$) $53
Features
Amenities
Sewer Fire-Ring
Picnic Table   Paved Patio
Pull-through   Back-in
  Paved Gravel
 
Site Type
Lane Surface
Site Surface
  Paved Gravel   Grass    
50 30   20
Playground Swimming   Golf
  Tennis   Waterfront   Other
Power
Play Areas
 
Reviews (as of 2019/5/19)
Reviewer
 
Rating Out of
Campground Reviews 6.7 Good 10
Good Sam 8 10
KOA 4 5
Tripadvisor n/a 5
Phoenix 6 10
Attractiveness 8 10
Friendliness 8 10
Tree Cover 7 10: Dense - 1: Treeless
Site Length 7 10
Site Width 6 10
Ease of Access 6 10
WiFiPhoenix Popup 4 10
Pros
  • Convenient but not too close to I-84.
  • Beautiful canyons
Cons
  • Too costly for value

Points of Interest

What separates the farmed plains of Twin Falls from my native Kansas are canyons! Deep canyons that interrupt the flow of the otherwise rectilinear grid of road that support the farms scattered throughout the region. Almost all my photos are of the canyons themselves, the waterfalls into the canyons, or fossils that were disgorged by the slow erosion of the canyon walls.

The big canyon is of course the Snake River Canyon,Phoenix Popup fed by the Salmon and Malad Rivers, each with their own canyons. The Snake River has its sources in western Wyoming, draining much of the western slope of the northern Rockies, winding through Idaho and finally emptying into the Columbia River in Washington. Along the way it has in places carved out deep gorges that have widened into canyons. This process was aided by vast floods from the collapse of glacial dams in the higher mountains at the end of the last Ice Age. Those floods of course ran both east and west from the mountains, but with different effects. When they encountered the soft sedimentary rock of the eastern plains, they meandered broadly over vast areas, carving out, for example, the Badlands of South Dakota. In the west they encountered harder stuff: granite and basalt. Once the channel was opened, later floods tended to deepen it than to dig new paths to the side. Thus the western canyons grew deep.

Hagerman Fossil Beds

The Hagerman Fossil Beds National Monument "contains the largest concentration of Hagerman horse fossils in North America". Its Visitors Center is located in downtown Hagerman. Its collection is small and focused on local fossils, almost entirely from the Pliocene Epoch (5.3-2.6 MYA). The pride of the collection is the Hagerman Horse.Wikipedia Discovered in 1928, it is "one of the oldest horses of the genus Equus".

The fossil beds themselves can be viewed from an overlook, but like many national monuments, resources are limited and exploratory tours are not available.

Photo Gallery for Hagerman Fossil Beds

Hagerman Fossil Beds
Hagerman Fossil Beds
Hagerman Fossil Beds
Hagerman Fossil Beds
Hagerman Fossil Beds
Hagerman Fossil Beds
Hagerman Fossil Beds
Pleiocene Camelops Jawbone
Hagerman Fossil Beds
Hagerman Fossil Beds
Pleiocene Camelops Jawbone
Hagerman Fossil Beds
Hagerman Fossil Beds
Pleiocene Camelops Leg Bone
Hagerman Fossil Beds
Hagerman Fossil Beds
Pleiocene Camelops Leg Bone
Do you see the tooth mark?
Hagerman Fossil Beds
Hagerman Fossil Beds
Pleiocene Snail (Gastropod)
Hagerman Fossil Beds
Hagerman Fossil Beds
Pleiocene Snail (Gastropod)
(I love the glassy shells!)
Hagerman Fossil Beds
Hagerman Fossil Beds
Modern PronghornWikipedia
(Taxonomically not an antelopeWikipedia)
Hagerman Fossil Beds
Hagerman Fossil Beds
Hagerman Fossil Beds
Modern Pronghorn
(Unlike deer, pronghorns have bony horns covered in a keratinous sheath.
Only the sheath is shed annually.Wikipedia)
Hagerman Fossil Beds
Modern Pronghorn
Hagerman Fossil Beds
Hagerman Fossil Beds
Pliocene Equus simplicidens
(The Hagerman HorseWikipedia)
Hagerman Fossil Beds
Hagerman Fossil Beds
Pliocene Equus simplicidens
(The Hagerman HorseWikipedia)
Hagerman Fossil Beds
Hagerman Fossil Beds
Pliocene Equus simplicidens
(The Hagerman HorseWikipedia)
Hagerman Fossil Beds
Hagerman Fossil Beds
Pliocene Equus simplicidens
(The Hagerman HorseWikipedia)
Hagerman Fossil Beds
Hagerman Fossil Beds
Pliocene Equus simplicidens
(The Hagerman HorseWikipedia)
Hagerman Fossil Beds
Hagerman Fossil Beds
Hagerman Fossil Beds
Hagerman Fossil Beds
Hagerman Fossil Beds
Hagerman Fossil Beds
Hagerman Fossil Beds
Hagerman Fossil Beds
Hagerman Fossil Beds
Hagerman Fossil Beds
Hagerman Fossil Beds
Hagerman Fossil Beds
Hagerman Fossil Beds
Hagerman Fossil Beds
Hagerman Fossil Beds
Hagerman Fossil Beds
Hagerman Fossil Beds
Hagerman Fossil Beds

Museum of the College of Southern Idaho

The College of Southern Idaho in Twin Falls has wisely invested in a museum for arts and sciences. The Herrett Center is small, as is its collection of fossils, most of which are replicas. But it does provide students and visitors with a basic introduction to the natural history of Idaho.

Photo Gallery for Museum of the College of Southern Idaho

Museum of the College of Southern Idaho
Museum of the College of Southern Idaho
Museum of the College of Southern Idaho
Museum of the College of Southern Idaho
Museum of the College of Southern Idaho
Mixoptgerus kiaeri
400 MYA (Early Devonian)
Museum of the College of Southern Idaho
Museum of the College of Southern Idaho
Mixoptgerus kiaeri
400 MYA (Early Devonian)
Museum of the College of Southern Idaho
Museum of the College of Southern Idaho
Mixoptgerus kiaeri
400 MYA (Early Devonian)
Museum of the College of Southern Idaho
Museum of the College of Southern Idaho
Terataspis grandis
375 MYA (Middle Devonian Period)
Museum of the College of Southern Idaho
Museum of the College of Southern Idaho
Terataspis grandis
375 MYA (Middle Devonian Period)
Museum of the College of Southern Idaho
Museum of the College of Southern Idaho
Coelurosaur
90 MYA (Late Cretaceous)
Museum of the College of Southern Idaho
Museum of the College of Southern Idaho
Coelurosaur
90 MYA (Late Cretaceous)
Museum of the College of Southern Idaho
Museum of the College of Southern Idaho
Psittacosaurus
90 MYA (Late Cretaceous)
Museum of the College of Southern Idaho
Museum of the College of Southern Idaho
Psittacosaurus
90 MYA (Late Cretaceous)
Museum of the College of Southern Idaho
Museum of the College of Southern Idaho
Diplomystus
58-36 MYA (Eocene Epoch)
Museum of the College of Southern Idaho
Museum of the College of Southern Idaho
Diplomystus
58-36 MYA (Eocene Epoch)
Museum of the College of Southern Idaho
Museum of the College of Southern Idaho
Priscacara
58-36 MYA (Eocene Epoch)
Museum of the College of Southern Idaho
Museum of the College of Southern Idaho
Priscacara
58-36 MYA (Eocene Epoch)
Museum of the College of Southern Idaho
Museum of the College of Southern Idaho
Merycoidodontidae
Eocene-Oligocene Epochs
Museum of the College of Southern Idaho
Museum of the College of Southern Idaho
Merycoidodontidae
Eocene-Oligocene Epochs
Museum of the College of Southern Idaho
Museum of the College of Southern Idaho
Eusmilus sicarius
30 MYA (Oligocene Epoch)
Museum of the College of Southern Idaho
Museum of the College of Southern Idaho
Eusmilus sicarius
30 MYA (Oligocene Epoch)
Museum of the College of Southern Idaho
Museum of the College of Southern Idaho
Smilodon fatalis
Pleistocene Epoch
Museum of the College of Southern Idaho
Museum of the College of Southern Idaho
Smilodon fatalis
Pleistocene Epoch
Museum of the College of Southern Idaho
Museum of the College of Southern Idaho
Mammuthus columbi
10,500 YA (Early Holocene Epoch)
Museum of the College of Southern Idaho
Museum of the College of Southern Idaho
Mammuthus columbi
10,500 YA (Early Holocene Epoch)
Museum of the College of Southern Idaho
Museum of the College of Southern Idaho
Mammuthus columbi
10,500 YA (Early Holocene Epoch)
Museum of the College of Southern Idaho
Museum of the College of Southern Idaho
Mammuthus columbi
10,500 YA (Early Holocene Epoch)
Museum of the College of Southern Idaho
Museum of the College of Southern Idaho
Mammuthus columbi
10,500 YA (Early Holocene Epoch)
Museum of the College of Southern Idaho
Museum of the College of Southern Idaho

Thousand Springs State Park

I noticed the deep canyon of the Malad River on my way to Twin Falls. When I saw the sign for Malad Gorge State Park, I immediately put it on my to-do list. Of course, it's not as grand as the Grand Canyon, but it was fun to explore, without all the bustle of its more popular cousin. I visited the park on my way to Hagerman, which is just a few miles to the south.

"Malad Gorge is a 250-foot-deep (76 m) canyon formed by the Malad River, downstream from a 60-foot (18 m) waterfall." The cliffs are formed of basalt, in many places visibly columnar,Wikipedia revealing their volcanic origins. In many places along the southern rim of the canyon, deep cracks have formed, as erosion prepares the cliff for calving. A short ways from the falls that continue to slowly dig the gorge to the east, its waters empty into the Snake River.

Malad Gorge State Park is part of the Thousand Springs State Park system. Some miles above the Malad, the cliffs north of the Salmon River tributary to the Snake release their "thousand springs", as the aquifer pours out its bounty. I don't know if there are a thousand, but there were far more than I wanted to count.

Photo Gallery for Thousand Springs State Park

Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Cliff Calving at
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Cliff Calving at
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Cliff Calving at
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Cliff Calving at
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Source of the Little Waterfall
Seen in Previous Photos of
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Parked among the Russian OliveWikipedia at
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Lichens at Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Lichens at Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Lichens at Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Lichens at Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Lichens at Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Lichens at Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Lichens at Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Lichens at Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Plants at Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Plants at Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Plants at Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Plants at Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Plants at Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Plants at Malad Gorge State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Thousand Springs State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Thousand Springs State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Thousand Springs State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Thousand Springs State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Thousand Springs State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Thousand Springs State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Thousand Springs State Park
Malad Gorge State Park
Thousand Springs State Park
Malad Gorge State Park

The Snake River Canyon

I almost missed the Snake River Canyon itself, though it was closest to my camp site, and I passed over it several times when I went shopping in Twin Falls. After my visit to Hagerman, this region experienced a long, unbroken period of rain. So I pretty much kept to my trailer. Finally, on the last Saturday of my stay, the weather relented to mostly cloudy, and I was able to take photos of the region. I also discovered where the money of the county was: along the canyon rim. Apparently the real estate moguls have been able to persuade people who want mega-bucks homes that such locations are safe, that despite the many places where huge blocks of rock are ready to calve off. Maybe this is just a way for the wealthy to Darwin themselves out of local society.

My photographs are from four different sites along the canyon, listed and shown moving downstream, but in almost the inverse order that I took them:

  1. Twin Falls, about four miles east of the city that took its name.Wikipedia It's "twin" no more. The power company closed off one of the parallel falls to get more energy from the remaining.
  2. Shoshone Falls, a couple miles closer to town, and more of a tourist attraction.Wikipedia
  3. The Perrine Bridge and Visitors Center, right on the main road twixt my KOA and the city.Wikipedia
  4. Centennial Waterfront Park, down in the canyon, west of the bridge.

Photo Gallery for The Snake River Canyon

Twin Falls, Idaho
Twin Falls
Twin Falls, Idaho
Twin Falls
Twin Falls, Idaho
Twin Falls
Twin Falls, Idaho
Twin Falls
Twin Falls, Idaho
Twin Falls
Twin Falls, Idaho
Twin Falls
Twin Falls, Idaho
Twin Falls
Twin Falls, Idaho
Twin Falls
Twin Falls, Idaho
Shoshone Falls
Twin Falls, Idaho
Shoshone Falls
Twin Falls, Idaho
Shoshone Falls
Twin Falls, Idaho
Shoshone Falls
Twin Falls, Idaho
Shoshone Falls
Twin Falls, Idaho
Shoshone Falls
Twin Falls, Idaho
Shoshone Falls
Twin Falls, Idaho
Shoshone Falls
Twin Falls, Idaho
Shoshone Falls
Twin Falls, Idaho
Shoshone Falls
Twin Falls, Idaho
Shoshone Falls
Twin Falls, Idaho
Shoshone Falls
Twin Falls, Idaho
Snake River Canyon from Bridge
Twin Falls, Idaho
Snake River Canyon from Bridge
Twin Falls, Idaho
Snake River Canyon from Bridge, Looking East
Twin Falls, Idaho
Snake River Canyon from Bridge, Looking East
Twin Falls, Idaho
Snake River Canyon from Bridge, Looking East
Twin Falls, Idaho
Snake River Canyon from Bridge, Looking East
Twin Falls, Idaho
Snake River Canyon from Bridge, Looking East
Twin Falls, Idaho
Snake River Canyon from Bridge, Looking Down at Kayaks
Twin Falls, Idaho
Snake River Canyon from Bridge, Looking West
Twin Falls, Idaho
Snake River Canyon from Bridge, Looking West
Twin Falls, Idaho
Snake River Canyon from Bridge, Looking West
Twin Falls, Idaho
Snake River Canyon from Bridge, Looking West
Twin Falls, Idaho
Snake River Canyon from Bridge, Looking West
Twin Falls, Idaho
Snake River Canyon from Bridge, Looking West
Twin Falls, Idaho
Snake River Canyon from Bridge, Looking West
Twin Falls, Idaho
Snake River Canyon from Bridge, Looking West
Twin Falls, Idaho
Snake River Canyon from Bridge, Looking West
Twin Falls, Idaho
Snake River Canyon from Bridge, Looking West
Twin Falls, Idaho
Snake River Canyon from Bridge, Looking West
Twin Falls, Idaho
Snake River Canyon from Bridge, Looking West
Twin Falls, Idaho
Snake River Canyon from Bridge, Looking West
Twin Falls, Idaho
Snake River Canyon from Bridge, Looking West
Twin Falls, Idaho
Snake River Canyon from Bridge, Looking West
Twin Falls, Idaho
Snake River Canyon from Bridge, Looking West
Twin Falls, Idaho
Snake River Canyon from Bridge, Looking West
Twin Falls, Idaho
Snake River Canyon from Bridge, Looking West
Twin Falls, Idaho
Snake River Canyon from Bridge, Looking West
Twin Falls, Idaho
Snake River Canyon from Bridge, Looking West
Twin Falls, Idaho
Snake River Canyon from Bridge, Looking West
Twin Falls, Idaho
Snake River Canyon from Bridge, Looking West
Twin Falls, Idaho
Snake River Canyon from Bridge, Looking West
Twin Falls, Idaho
Snake River Canyon from Bridge, Looking West
Twin Falls, Idaho

Onward

Well, that's all from Twin Falls. My next stop was Salt Lake City, in order to visit the Great Salt Lake itself, and the Natural History Museum of Utah.

Happy Trails!

Comments and Conversation

Readers of the Phoenix Nest have sent me comments about this page, which I include below, arranged by topic, along with any replies I have made.

Conversation 1: TOPIC1

COMMENT1

COMMENT1

Route of Journey from Twin Falls, Idaho, to Salt Lake City
Next Destination: Salt Lake City KOA, Salt Lake City

Revisions to This Page

This panel describes the significant revisions made to the appearance and function of this page. It ignores corrections of spelling, grammar, and other clerical problems, as well as debugging of the underlying code, and style changes that apply to all of the Phoenix Nest.

Preface to Revision of 2018, December

The Phoenix has revised the appearance of this itinerary and of new entries in his journal of his Grand Fossil Tour: The various sections are sometimes collapsed under their respective titles. Click on the + to expand any section you choose; click on the × to collapse it.

Often the structure of the page will be so obvious, that the Page Contents section won't be shown at all.

What do you think of the new look? Send him an email:

Earlier Revisions

Preface to Revision of YYYY, MMMM D

 

Oops! Could not find that item!

I have always embedded Google Maps™ of my routes from place to place. These maps not only gave you a general overview of where I was, they allowed you to open that route in Google Maps itself, to zoom in and out as you willed, in order to look more closely at the geography of my travels.

I am sad to report that I can no longer show you Google Maps™ of my routes. Google, in its infinite corporate wisdom, now charges a fee to embed such"advanced" features, a cost which a pro bono site like this cannot endure.

From now on, I will only show you Google Maps™ of the previous, current, and next locations where I stay (at least until Google gets even greedier, and puts a price on those too). In addition, I will show you non-interactive images (screen shots) of maps of my routes. All maps will be included in the Journey section of the blog (rather than having the next destination map at the end).

Nonetheless, you can still view my route, in Google Maps™, at no cost to either of us (yet). On either the Current Location or the Next Destination map:

  1. Click on "View larger map" to open the map in Google Maps™.
  2. Click on the "Directions" button.
  3. If you opened the Current Location map, replace"Your location" with "Pendleton, Oregon".
  4. If you opened the Next Destination map, replace"Your location" with "Twin Falls, Idaho".
  5. Hit Return.

Of course this procedure doesn't show you which among alternative routes I took, or what side trips I ventured on, or what strange adventures my phone's GPS might have sent me down, but I will give you an approximation of my route.

The channel of the Snake is not a single, continuous canyon. Wikipedia distinguishes three separate segments: the "Grand Canyon" of Wyoming,, the Snake River Canyon of southern Idaho, and the Hells Canyon along Idaho's border with Oregon and Washington.

  ×

Content of Message Not Found!